Thank You, Love 20Something

As the last moments of my twenties come to a close, I want to thank everyone who has read and commented on 20Something. I started this blog when I was 22. I remember the day exactly; I felt the need to write- this primal urge to get everything out. Hence, this blog started. I sat in the basement of the campus library and wrote my first post, feeling confused about what I was going to do after college. I wrote down a life plan but little did I know at that moment, I was about to stray from everything I planned… which was the best thing that ever happened to me. After all, all those moments led me to where I’m at today.

To all you twenty-somethings out there, you all are incredibly brave indivisuals. Your twenties are insanely scary but they are also fun- drinking officially at 21 (yay)! Falling in love for the first time (double yay!). Stumbling along a career path (yay!/nay?).  This time is for intense self-discovery and making mistakes, both big ones and tiny ones; creating a life for yourself outside your family and home life and learning what it means to be on your own. It’s about learning how to take risks and becoming a better risk taker with each passing year. This is the time to risk it all in the name of love, friendship, education and career. Eh, what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, am I right?

So, I bid adieu to my roaring twenties… and am saying hello to my flirty, dirty thirties, greeting this decade with my arms open wide.

I’m about to go party like a rock star.

Thanks again, dear reader. Love, Andrea

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#ThisIs30

T-minus two days until the big 3-0.

Yes, I am terrified. Last night, I broke down my fears to one of my best friends- “I don’t like a grown-up and 30 seems so adult, so finite. I have reached the age where you need to have your shit together. But I just keep fumbling. People younger than me are buying houses and I’m still looking for a job.” I must admit that I’m not proud of the place I’m in and a lot of the choices I made in my twenties. I always thought when I reached this milestone, I’d be an editor at a magazine, well-traveled, married, possibly pregnant… well, I’m just not the person I thought I would be.

I’ve been trying to tell myself that 30 is going to be awesome but I needed more justification. Over the night, I’ve read multiple essays from celebrities, writers and businesswomen about the joys of this new decade of life. I needed to hear that things would be better (even though my body will undergo some serious changes. Just no more gray hair, please)- in the words of Maya Angelou, “When you know better, you do better.”

Listed below are some of my favorite quotes:

“Thirty was always the age I wanted to be. I didn’t look forward to 16 or 21 or even 25. I was like: 30. I assumed by then I would be fully formed and comfortable in my skin and in my body, and I’d know who I was. My twenties were great, but they were hard. You want to get past the learning curve and then have fun.” –America Ferrera

“Your twenties come with a lot of self-doubt and anxiety around big life questions: What are you going to do with your career? Who are you going to end up with? Where are you going to live? In your thirties, you just know yourself better.” –Lauren Bush Lauren

“Your twenties were for ‘ducking up,’ as my auto-correct would say, and learning from those mistakes. Now, you get to live with that knowledge under your belt. I’m hitting a major milestone: 30, or as I like to call it, the Cut the Bullshit and Go Be Awesome stage.” –Olivia Wilde

“(Turning 30) made me want to look at myself and see what behavior I want to bring into my 30s, and what I want to leave in my 20s. I’m such a people pleaser and from an unstable background. I translate too many things into guilt. I’m ready to let go of that.” –Drew Barrymore

“The body is at its best between the ages of thirty and thirty-five…” -Aristotle

“My friends reassured me that 30 was secretly the best, most important birthday a woman could have. Like a reverse Cinderella, my life would magically improve on the dot of midnight. My brain would mysteriously expand, and somehow all the things that didn’t make sense in my twenties—how and why people behaved the way they did, how to play the game—would all be made clear. I’d be smarter. I wouldn’t get fooled like I did in my twenties. And you know what? All those friends were right. –Candace Bushnell

What are your thoughts on turning 30, dear reader? Any advice?